Even though we are in the last dog days of summer, but once the cloudy and cold days come we can’t forget about sun protection. The sun is around all-year round, not just in the summer!

While women get constant reminders of the importance of sunscreen and sun protection it is up to us to keep the men and children in our lives aware too.

Most sun damage occurs before the age of 18 and white men over 50 are more likely to be diagnosed with melanoma.

Most of us slather on the sunscreen when we know we will have an extended trip outdoors, but don’t forget about what is called “innocent sun exposure.” The times we spend outside walking to and out of the store, driving in the car, or walking the dog.

I have found that when I send my kids outside to play or take them to the park in their UV Skinz swim shirts then they have more fun (because I’m not holding them hostage while I try to rub sunscreen all over them) and I don’t have to worry about them being affected with “innocent sun exposure.” UV Skinz is worry-free sun protection because they all protect against 98% of the UVA and UVB rays.

You still have a chance to own a UV Skinz of your own! Check out our latest deals and Live in Our Skinz!”

Here is a list of sun protection facts that I thought would be interesting to share!

BY THE NUMBERS

1: Number of ounces of sunscreen the average person needs to cover their exposed body; same amount as in a shot glass.

2: Number of hours recommended between sunscreen applications.

3: Number of years sunscreen should be good for, unless indicated by an expiration date.

15: Minimum amount of minutes sunscreen should be applied before going into the sun.

15: Minimum SPF, with broad-spectrum UV coverage, recommended by dermatologists.

25:?Percent of the sun’s rays reflected by sand.

50: Percent of UVB rays screened out by an SPF 2.

80:?Percent of the sun’s ultraviolet rays that can pass through clouds. 93: Percent of UVB rays screened out by an SPF 15.

97:?Percent of UVB rays screened out by an SPF 30

Source: Wicked Local Reading