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Men and Skin Cancer: The Facts You Should Know

Men and Skin Cancer: The Facts You Should Know

It’s no secret that women are known to be more proactive regarding their general health than men, this especially being the case in relation to getting their skin checked and applying sunscreen. But according to some eye opening skin cancer statistics, men need to do more in order to protect themselves from the dangerous effects of too much sun exposure. Between outdoor work and recreation, men on average accumulate more unprotected sun exposure than women, …

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Melanoma Rates on the Rise in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) — New cases of the deadly skin cancer melanoma are increasing among men and women in the United States, particularly among older men, researchers report. Whether the increase in melanoma signals an epidemic is a matter of debate. However, the rate is increasing among all Americans and cannot be due to better screening alone, the researchers contend. full story – Here

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Melanoma cases likely to decline

Article found on stuff.co.nz: *New Zealand could lose its unenviable reputation as the skin-cancer centre of the world thanks to climate change.* Extreme levels of ultra-violet (UV) radiation caused by clear skies and bright sunshine kill between 250 and 300 Kiwis a year, giving New Zealand the highest death rate from melanoma in the world. However, there may be cause for celebration, with some scientists believing that by the second half of this century the …

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New cancer cases decline; melanoma on rise

Lauran Neergaard ASSOCIATED PRESS Wednesday, November 26, 2008 The rate of new cancer cases finally may be inching down – cautiously optimistic news but a gain that specialists worry could be derailed by economic turmoil. Death rates from cancer have been dropping slowly for years, thanks to earlier detection and better treatments. But preventing cancer is the ultimate goal, and Tuesday’s annual “Report to the Nation” on cancer also shows a small but encouraging change: …

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